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2 hikers and 2 dogs rescued by Coast Guard aircrew on Cupola Mountain in Sitka, Alaska

2 hikers and 2 dogs rescued by Coast Guard aircrew on Cupola Mountain in Sitka, Alaska, Coast Guard Cupola Mountain
A MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Sitka hoists approximately 1,300 feet of oil containment boom using cargo nets in Juneau. this is as part of a Geographic Response Strategy listed in the Southeast Alaska Area Contingency Plan.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jon-Paul Rios (archive).

KODIAK, Alaska — A U. S. Coast Guard Air Station Sitka aircrew rescued two hikers and their two dogs off of Cupola Mountain in Sitka, Alaska, this Sunday.

The MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew safely hoisted and transported the hikers to awaiting Emergency Medical Service personnel at the hospital in Sitka.

At 9:30 a.m., Sector Juneau Command Center personnel received a call from Alaska State Troopers requesting assistance after one of the hikers reportedly suffered a severely injured ankle and could not hike out.

“The Sitka Fire Department initially received the call via cell phone from one of the hikers, reporting that she injured her leg,” said Coast Guard Lt. Michael Klakring, pilot, Air Station Sitka. “The helo crew arrived on scene about five minutes after takeoff and visually spotted the hikers. The rescue swimmer deployed, assessed the hiker’s condition and splinted the injured leg before hoisting them off the mountain.”

The hikers and their dogs were located at an elevation of approximately 2,300 feet.

2 hikers and 2 dogs rescued by Coast Guard aircrew on Cupola Mountain in Sitka, Alaska, Coast Guard Cupola Mountain
A Coast Guard Air Station Sitka crewmember assists an injured hiker on Cupola Mountain in Sitka, Alaska, on Sept. 29, 2019. The hiker, who was with a friend and their two dogs, reportedly suffered a severely injured ankle and could not hike out. U.S. Coast Guard Courtesy photo.

“In this case, there was enough daylight left to visually spot the distressed party once we arrived,” said Klakring. “A signaling device and distress beacon will always make searching easier and allow for a quicker rescue.”

-USCG-

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